All about Amy

Hi! My name is Amy Gauger and I’m a sophomore at UAF (finally!). I’ve been taking onesie-twosies classes off and on for about 6 years now, in between work and running around after kids. I work with the AK Air Guard, which has allowed me some pretty amazing travel oppurtunities – London should be on everyone’s bucket list and Turkey is full of absolutely fascinating history. I have two kids, both of whom are autistic, and who have taught me more about life than I could ever possibly ¬†imagine. I love to travel (good thing, huh?), think Alaska gets colder than is strictly neccessary, and love to get out into nature and hike all over the place. Baking is also a way of life for me.

I’ve taken several online classes and will probably keep it up until the degree says otherwise because they fit around my work and kid schedule. I’ve got to say, just from reading the syllubus and reading material, it sounds like this class is going to be pretty great. Especially the do-gooder prayer chain. Bring it on, sister.

Ny’chall!
Amy

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7 thoughts on “All about Amy

  1. sharissewatkins

    I love that you are in the military too! It takes a lot out of you but it is so cool you have been those places, I’ll be lucky just to go to Germany, ha-ha. I also agree that Alaska is too cold, if you have to rebuild highways yearly because of perma frost, it was not meant to be! But that’s just me, I am totally against anything that is below freezing. I might have skipped over the do-gooder prayer chain thing what is it? What is your degree you are working on in ? Nice to meet you!

    Reply
    1. amymgauger Post author

      Lol, the instructor mentioned that if we didn’t respond to emails, post a blog, etc, she’d send community do-gooders and start a prayer chain to find us (ie, eCampus would send us a reminder that the semester had started). That’s all that was. And yeah, the military does take a lot out of you, but I wouldn’t trade the experience for anything! Maybe you can get a hop to where you wanna go – and Germany is amazing. Best food ever and soooo much history. Count yourself lucky to get there!

      Reply
  2. smaldonadodiaz

    Is cool that you are taking advantage of your opportunities in life. The military does takes some time from you, but believe me, as a civilian, there is not that much of a difference. I am still running around like a chicken without a head, still have to be responsible and flexible, just like in the military. So enjoy your career, while your health last.

    Reply
  3. Mary Filbin

    London is great. I got to spend a day there (while the Olympics where in town) after a long but wonderful week in Scotland (another do not miss place). I think my other favorite place was Spain. There is a lot of history there too. My family is huge museum/archeological site nerds. Getting to see the world is a treasure that so many can not or choose not to do. What amazed me most was that all my preconceived ideas where blown away…for some reason I thought it would be like an alien place where in reality it was similar to other places I had been in the US and such. Blessings.

    Reply
  4. bdfleagle

    Amy,

    Your enthusiasm has drawn several of us in apparently. I want to make sure I reply to two posts as required, but I have a hard time just saying “blah, blah, blah…”, so I thank you for giving us some great bits to chew on! Life in the military is a challenge. I was a Marine. Life was simple. Get up at reveille, show up for duty, get off duty, sleep. Tent city in the desert, or fly to Japan, fly to Okinawa, fly to Korea, fly to Philippines, etc. But it seems that as time has passed, life in the military is blended with civilian life far more than in the old days and therefore your time and your commitment can be overtaxed. I liked it better in my day. There was a simplicity then that I miss now. I had a seabag, my gear, my book, my Bible, my buddies, my job, oh, …and a shaving kit. Thanks for making those memories come to life!

    Reply
    1. amymgauger Post author

      I hear you! My fondest memories, honestly, are of a tent city in the desert. No paperwork, no red tape, just a mission and group of guys (and gals) doing their best to make it happen. That being said, it’s hard to beat actually being home on Christmas morning!

      Reply

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